Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Review Copy Arrival: Through the Triangle by C.P. Stewart

Through the Triangle by C.P. Stewart

I received this book from the author through Bostick Communications.
Mysterious places exist in this world, where the unexplained is more common than one would expect. There are areas where people, watercraft, and airplanes have vanished, as if they never existed. Three of these areas lie in and around Alaska, Japan, and Florida. The latter of these three is widely known as the Bermuda Triangle, or Devil's Triangle, in which ships, planes, and more than a thousand people on them have disappeared without a trace. These people have become statistics, but were actual living breathing people with families, friends, and acquaintances. Reflect for a moment on what these people experienced as they transitioned from being a normal person to a memory in the blink of an eye. Did they cease to exist? Theories abound on the reason for the disappearances, ranging from the natural -- weather and methane gas, to the more radical UFO abductions.

About the Author: C. P. Stewart taught chemistry and physics in high school and occasionally at the university level. He is a lifelong resident of western Pennsylvania and has been captivated by these areas of mysterious disappearances, in particular the Bermuda Triangle. He is not alone, because fascination with the Bermuda Triangle has spawned legends, books, movies, songs, websites, plays, television specials, a mini-series, and even a magic trick by David Copperfield. Before writing Through the Triangle, which allows the reader to follow five individuals as they experience the Triangle’s capriciousness and consequences, he performed abundant research by studying writings of noted physicists on the topics of String (Membrane) Theory and the latest discoveries dealing with Spacetime. He also was particularly interested in written accounts of individuals who experienced close encounters within the Bermuda Triangle and survived. In one such confrontation, a pilot claims to have moved thirty minutes forward in time while in an encompassing fog, which he referred to as an electronic fog, or Timestorm.


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